There are a number of smartphone Apps that CERT members and others may find useful in an emergency, or in preparing for one. All those listed here are available for both iOS and Android, and either free or with price noted. Suggestions for additional Apps are welcome.

SD Emergency
Created by the The County of San Diego Office of Emergency Services (OES). The SD Emergency App contains disaster preparedness information, interactive checklists to help you to create your emergency plan, build an emergency supplies kit, and when disaster strikes; the SD Emergency App will keep you and your family informed with emergency updates, interactive emergency maps, and shelter locations.

FEMA App
Provided by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Contains disaster safety tips, an interactive emergency kit list, emergency meeting location information, and a map with open shelters and open FEMA Disaster Recovery Centers (DRCs). A Disaster Reporter feature lets you take and submit GPS photo reports of disasters so they can be displayed on a public map for others to view.

First Aid and CPR

Hands-Only CPR
Provided by the American Heart Association. Teaches the method through videos. Guides/aids you in a real time emergency in calling 911 and performing Hands-Only CPR.

First Aid by American Red Cross
Puts expert advice for everyday emergencies in your hand. Gives you instant access to the information you need to know to handle the most common first aid emergencies. With videos, interactive quizzes and simple step-by-step advice.

Pocket First Aid & CPR
Provided by the American Heart Association. ($1.99 on iTunes June 2014). Hundreds of pages with illustrations and videos, including topics such as CPR, choking, bites, bruises, burns, seizures, diabetic emergencies, and more.

PulsePoint and PulsePoint AED
PulsePoint empowers individuals, within covered communities, with the ability to provide life-saving assistance to victims of cardiac arrest. Application users who have indicated they are trained in cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) are notified if someone nearby is having a cardiac emergency and may require CPR. If the medical emergency is in a public place, the application uses sophisticated location-based services to alert trained citizens in the immediate vicinity of the need for CPR. The application also directs these citizen rescuers to the exact location of the closest public access Automated External Defibrillator (AED).

San Diego County was added to the list of covered communities in July 2014.

PulsePoint AED, a separate App, lets you report and update AED locations so that emergency responders – nearby citizens trained in CPR or local firefighters, police or medics — can find an AED close to them when a cardiac emergency occurs.

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